How shortage of human resource is affecting service delivery at Jinja Regional Referral Hospital

By Beatrice Nyangoma
Human resource is the biggest component in any health care system. However, Uganda’s health care services have been affected because generally there is a shortage of medical doctors.
Jinja Regional Referral hospital a facility located in Jinja town and it serves a population of the entire Busoga region that is over 60,0000. The hospital receives  referrals from health centres in the districts of Iganga, Buikwe, Namutumba, Luuka, Mayuge, Bugiri, among others. However one of the biggest the challenge the hospital is faced with is shortage of health workers.
Dr  Dan Baliwo Nsereko, the Deputy Director the hospital has decided to close some of the hospital units such as the cancer treatment center.The centre was refurbished with support from Twegaite International Organization; a US based non-government organization bringing together Ugandans from Busoga region and their friends in the diaspora.

The centre was refurbished in response to government’s plans to decentralize cancer screening and treatment. However, the centre has remained under lock and key leaving cancer patients with nowhere to turn for help.

He says the facility can accommodate 50 patients but lacks equipment and staff to run it.  According to Dr Nsereko, the centre needs an oncologist, a surgeon and at least three nurses.

He says currently all suspected cancer patients are referred to Uganda Cancer Institute-UCI for treatment.

James Wako, a prostate cancer patient from Namulesa village, says he spends at least  50,000 Shillings to travel to UCI for treatment, adding that at times he has to wait for days when the institute lacks some drugs.

“It is very expensive for me to travel every month to get drugs as simple as Morphine. If Jinja ward was operational, I would be happy,” he said.

According to Alitwala, the number of mental health patients has almost doubled in the previous three months. She explains that they used to receive between 20 and 30 patients daily, but the number has increased to over 60 patients.

Alitwala also notes that the unit is faced with a challenge of essential drug stockouts, adding that they have spent over two years without receiving Phenytoin and Injectable Fluphenzine, the two most essential drugs for mental illness.

Sarah Mudondo, a care take to one of the patients who has spent four weeks in the facility. She says that she spends more than Shillings 20,000 on drugs and food daily.

Alitwala emphasizes that the failure by the hospital to provide meals to the patients is a big setback. She says that in most cases they are forced to suspend medication to patients especially with HIV when they learn that the patient has not eaten.

She also cited insecurity as another challenge in the hospital. The mental health unit relies on the guards at the main gate, which is a very long distance from the unit.

“We have two nurses on night duty and there is a time when a patient wanted to strangle a nurse.  They had had to call security personnel at the main entrance, which is very risky,” she said.

The hospital’s intensive Care Unit also lies underutilized due to lack of specialists. The 13-bed ICU unit is the largest in eastern Uganda.

The 5 billion Shillings facility, donated by ASSIST International, was commissioned in September 2011. It is equipped with cardiac monitors, ventilators, pulse oximeters and defibrillators capable of treating patients with critical illnesses of the lung, heart and kidneys.

It was expected to serve patients in eastern Uganda and reduce referral cases to the National Referral Hospital in Mulago.  However,  the hospital does not have the technical expertise to run the facility.

An ideal intensive care unit requires doctors with specialty in anesthetics, cardiology and emergency medicine. It also needs physiotherapists, dieticians, speech therapists and nurses. The role is nurses is however limited to delivery of medicines, prescribed by the doctors and monitoring blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen levels.

However, the ICU at Jinja Referral Hospital does not have all the specialists needed to keep it functional.

The hospital principal Nursing Officer Aceng Florence says that the facility requires at least 30 nurses to operate effectively. She notes that at the moment, they cannot admit more than three patients at a time due to shortage of staff. The unit has only three nurses.

In an ideal situation, according to Aceng, one patient should be attended to by at least four nurses, and 12 nurses should therefore be in place to work every 24 hours.

Christine Akello, one the nurses at the unit says that running the unit hectic especially when there are emergencies such as accidents. She notes that since the start of this year, the unit has admitted only 11 patients and others have been turned away because there are no doctors to attend to them.

Muhammed Khalifa Mbhete, the Jinja central division Councillor and chairperson of the health committee says that the state of Jinja hospital is generally appalling. He notes that every department in the hospital has an essential component missing.

However, like other units that lack staff, there is hope that the unit will get more staff following a request by the hospital administration to the Health Service Commission two years ago.

beatricenyangoma@gmail.com
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s